Friday, August 18, 2017

Factors that Affect the Value of a Pocketwatch


Craig Duling is an expert in rare timepieces who currently applies his knowledge as an antiquarian horologist as the owner of Heritagepocketwatch.com. A former missile and space engineer, Craig Duling has extensive experience in the assessment and evaluation of pocket watches

The assessment and valuation of pocket watches, particularly vintage models, is extremely complex due to the wide variety of designs, styles, dates of production, and components. Identification, which requires the age and manufacturer to be pinpointed, is often a first step. Quality is also an important factor. The number of jewels, finish quality, and the materials used can be used to grade the quality of a watch.

In addition to the overall quality of the watch, the visual appearance and working condition are also factors that impact value. For example, water damage, cracks, or other damage can impact the internal functions and appearance of a pocket watch. Alternatively, unique features such as an uncommon effacement or diamond accessories, and the rarity of the watch can enhance value.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Development of the American Railroad Pocket Watch


An entrepreneurial leader, Craig Duling guides Heritage Management Services, Inc., and has contributed extensively to his local community. Away from work, Craig Duling has a passion for antique timepieces and maintains a blog in which he provides information oriented toward investment-grade pocket watch collectors.

Of particular interest to American collectors are railroad pocket watches, which were standard issue for conductors from the 1820s, when railroad travel emerged. Brakemen, enginemen, and yard foremen were also required to carry these pocket watches, for which railroad-grade guidelines were developed in 1893. 

The timepiece was of critical importance prior to the invention of the telegraph in the 1840s, as trains often shared a single track in opposite directions, and communication while in transit was not possible. Timetables emerged to ensure that trains did not collide and were kept on the most efficient schedule possible. Unified standards for the watches came into being after a fatal head-on collision in which a faulty watch, which started and stopped, thus losing four minutes, was the culprit.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

The Uses of Jewels within Timepieces


Craig Duling is a California entrepreneur who serves as CEO of Heritage Management Services, Inc. In terms of hobbies, he has a longstanding interest in collecting antique pocket watches. On his blog site Heritage Pocket Watch, Craig Duling features a wealth of information on vintage and collectible timepieces and archives rare pieces for the sake of historic documentation.

One article on the site explains the non-decorative use of jewels to eliminate friction in watch movements to the maximum extent possible. Smooth and hard, faux rubies used for this purpose are made from ammonia and aluminum, and put through a variety of heat and chemical processes, ultimately resulting in what is known as a boule. The boule then undergoes as many as 50 additional cuts and processes, which ensures that it is as hard and smooth as possible. 

These jewels have a variety of cuts and uses, with timepieces of higher quality often featuring a 17 or more of them throughout the watch mechanism. One key advantage they provide is in enabling the mainspring to be designed in as efficient a manner as possible, which boosts the running times.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors – Craft Competition





An avid collector of pocket watches, Craig Duling serves as the creator of www.heritagepocketwatch.com. His website allows him to share his interest in timepieces and educate the public about the rich history of clocks and watches. Additionally, Craig Duling is a member of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC). 

The National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors is dedicated to the art and science of timekeeping. Its members work to preserve timepieces and their heritage, provide timepiece education, and pay respect to the long-held tradition of creating mechanical clocks and pocket watches. 

Each year, the NAWCC hosts a national convention in order to celebrate timepieces and the people who love them. Attendees can view and learn more about a wide range of clocks and other horological items at this exciting event.

The convention also features a Crafts Competition, an event for the artists who build, restore, and decorate timepieces. This contest includes 27 categories that cover everything from clock movements to cosmetic details like gold leafing. There is also a special People's Choice Award, that honors attendees favorite timepiece each year.

Saturday, January 21, 2017

How to recognize a fake Rolex – Submariner



Let me begin by jumping right in and giving you a list of what to look for since this is why you chose to read this article.  At the end of this list please take time to read the article because it will help put the list in perspective.
An authentic Rolex Submariner model (newer model such as the 116610) should have the following.
  1. When you set the time and rotate the winding stem clockwise the hands should also rotate clockwise.  This should be the case for Rolex watches in general.  If the hands rotate counter clockwise you have a fake Rolex movement.
  2. When you pull out the winding stem the second hand should stop moving.
  3. When you rotate the bezel, there should be 120 clicks per 1 complete revolution.
  4. The Submariner has a sapphire crystal.  An easy way to determine if the crystal is sapphire is to place 1-drop of water in the center of the crystal and see if the drop remains in place and keeps its shape.  If it does, it is sapphire.  If the water drop spreads out flat and runs off the crystal it is not sapphire.  All Rolex watches have a sapphire crystal.
  5. The Rehaut is the name for the inner bezel.  This is a french word for flange. The inner bezel is the ring that separates the dial from the crystal.  If one carefully examines, with a loop, the word Rolex which is laser etched into the Rehaut the letters will be extremely smooth and sharp.  In a fake, the laser technology is too expensive to use and the letter engraving will appear to look slightly rough.
  6. At the 6 o’clock position on the underneath side of the crystal there is a Rolex crown symbol etched into it.  This micro-etching began in 2002. This will be almost impossible to see with the naked eye.  In an authentic Submariner you will need a magnifying glass to see it and even then one will need to angle the watch to just the right position. In fake Submariners you will easily be able to see it because the “knock-off” manufacturers don’t want you to miss it.  If it is easy to spot, you have a fake.
  7. Look at the Cyclops magnifying lens that envelops the date at three o’clock position. The true Rolex magnifies at two and a half times and has a definitive convex shape to it.
  8. The hour markers, hands, and the dot in the triangle on the bezel ALL should illuminate in the same teal color in the dark.  Hold your watch under a light (flashlight, table lamp, etc.) for a few seconds and then enter a closet and close the door and see if this is the case.  Many fakes use the cheapest hands they can buy and these hands can illuminate in many different colors.
  9. On the Submariner there should be 3 dots below the crown symbol on the winding stem.
  10. The edges of the bracelet links should be smooth and have no sharp edges.
  11. On the back of the case the protective plastic cover on the 116610 should be clear and not green.  This is assuming of course that the protective cover has not been removed.  Most fake manufacturers don’t realize that Rolex did away with the green colored cover and continue to use it.
  12. Finally, check out the caseback. Rolex doesn’t make a clear caseback that enables you to see the movement so if you turn a watch over and you have a clear window in which to observe the movement, you know it is a fake. Another caseback trick is that many fakes engrave the Rolex name and crown logo on the caseback. A true Rolex has no engraving on the back.
  13. An authentic Submariner with a stainless steel bracelet, with no links having been removed, will weigh 158 grams.
  14. A high-end fake may meet the above requirements except for numbers 5 and 10 so you still need to be very careful.
  15. There are many more things I could mention but I don’t want the counterfeiters to learn too much good information.  Remember that there are more fake luxury watches produced each year than authentic ones.  This is difficult to imagine but it is true because this is a BILLION dollar a year industry.
Read more about How to recognize a fake Rolex – Submariner here

Source: http://heritagepocketwatch.com/how-to-recognize-fake-luxury-wristwatches-especially-a-rolex/